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13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do
Amy Morin
Take back your power, embrace change, face your fears, and train your brain for happiness and success. Life is hard. Inevitably, life will become increasingly difficult as you experience tragedy and setbacks. It’s easy to let those moments break you down, but by focusing on your bad habits and weaknesses, you can learn to come out the other side a stronger, better person. To become mentally strong, there are thirteen habits to avoid such as resenting other people’s success and dwelling on the past. Instead, Morin provides practical strategies to help readers avoid the thirteen common habits that hold them back. Like physical strength, mental strength requires healthy habits, exercise, and hard work. Throughout 13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do, Morin shows how to embrace a happier outlook on life and how to deal with life’s inevitable hardships, setbacks, and heartbreaks. Keep reading to learn how to achieve greater mental strength and achieve overall success and happiness.
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28 minutes
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Drunk Tank Pink
Adam Alter
Learn how colors, words, and symbols unknowingly alter the way you think, behave, and perceive reality. The title Drunk Tank Pink is in reference to the discovery that when jail cells are painted pink it reduces violence among inmates. In this book social psychologist Adam Alter guides us through the many thousands of ways our minds are influenced and manipulated, both knowingly and unknowingly. As Alter puts it “Your mind is the collective end point of a billion tiny butterfly effects” In this summary we’ll dive into the ethereal world of the subconscious mind and learn how signs and symbols around us affect how we perceive the world, how the behavior of others can change the way we view ourselves, how your name can potentially help determine your career, and more.
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19 minutes
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Experiments With People
Robert P. Abelson, Kurt P. Frey, Aiden P. Gregg
Discover the history and insights of experiments in social psychology. It’s no surprise that the field of psychology has long depended on experiments involving people. But how much do we really know about these experiments? And what can we learn from them? Three leading researchers in social psychology set out to answer these questions and Experiments With People (2003) is the fruit of their labor. By examining 28 fascinating case studies, Experiments With People charts the history and effect of social psychology through the twentieth century.
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16 minutes
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Flow
Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi
Flow invites us to step outside the mundane experiences of our everyday lives to craft the optimum psychological experience through making a few simple yet radical choices in our everyday lives. Exploring the overall dissatisfaction with life and obsession with instant gratification which besets humanity, psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi presents a new method of attacking the status quo. By challenging ourselves to learn new skills, develop our passions, and fine-tune our senses, Csikszentmihalyi posits that we can generate a state of happiness and focus which will help us find our flow: that psychological state of pleasure, engagement, and satisfaction which brings meaning to our lives.
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24 minutes
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Free Will
Sam Harris
Learn How Free Will is All An Illusion and How You Cannot Control Your Thoughts and Actions Do you believe you are in control of your thoughts and actions? That you wake up each morning and go about your day making decisions based on your own free will? The answer is no. The facts tell us that free will is only an illusion. According to neuroscience research, the thoughts that go through our minds and the actions we take each day has almost nothing to do with our free will. That’s because we are not in control. “The popular conception of free will rests on two assumptions: 1) that each of us could have behaved differently than we did in the past, and 2) that we are the conscious source of most of our thoughts and actions in the present.” As you’re about to find out, these assumptions are wrong. Additionally, you’ll learn how your brain makes decisions for you, why a cold-blooded murderer cannot be responsible for his actions, and how the beliefs of politicians are based on false assumptions.
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16 minutes
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It Didn’t Start With You
Mark Wolynn
A guide to understanding how family trauma shapes our personalities Have you ever wondered why you battle some of the mental health problems that wreak havoc in your life? Have you ever felt “crazy” or like there was something wrong with you? In this exploration of family history and inherited trauma, Mark Wolynn writes to provide psychological evidence that you’re not alone and it’s not your fault.
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18 minutes
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Madness in Civilization
Andrew Scull
The story of how mental illness has historically been viewed as “madness”, from biblical times to modern medicine. Whether in the bible, the theatre, or in novels, insanity has a long history of historical depiction, and has been viewed as a medical ailment primarily known as “madness” for centuries. But the differences, and the similarities, between this historical view and the modern field of mental health are fascinating. In this summary we’ll explore the way society has viewed madness throughout the ages. From demonic possession suppressed memories, we’ll discuss the varying ways people have thought about the causes and cures for madness.
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15 minutes
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Maps of Meaning
Jordan B. Peterson
Learn why myths give us meaning. When we think of something that’s not true, we tend to say, “That’s just a myth!” But at the same time, we treasure collections of ancient Greek or Egyptian mythology. That’s because myths tell us stories that inform our interpretation of the world. Written by controversial psychologist and right-wing celebrity Jordan Peterson, Maps of Meaning (1999) posits that myths bring meaning to our lives and that we need them, whether we believe in them or not.
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13 minutes
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Maybe You Should Talk To Someone
Lori Gottlieb
What one therapist learned from her therapist. If you’ve ever thought therapists have it all together, think again! In this poignant and unusual memoir, the author-- a therapist-- writes openly about her own struggles with mental health. After her life circumstances led her to seek professional help herself, the author discovered new insights about herself and her profession as a therapist. Maybe You Should Talk to Someone (2019) is her way of documenting these experiences and the revelations she learned.
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14 minutes
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No Self, No Problem!
Chris Niebauer
Buddhism posits that there’s no such thing as one continuous self. No Self, No Problem (2019) draws on recent psychological research to show how modern psychology actually affirms this core tenet of Buddhism as scientific truth. Blending neuroscientific data with the foundational principles of Buddhism, Chris Niebauer presents evidence that our sense of self is, in fact, part social construct, part delusion. Offering examples of research which confirms that our concept of the self is merely a mirage generated by the language centers of our brains, Niebauer destabilizes our understanding of ourselves and asks us to question how self-improvement works if there is no such thing as one concrete, stable self.
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20 minutes
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